Frederick Handley Page

Frederick Handley Page


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Frederick Handley Page was born in Cheltenham, Goucestershire, in 1885. He became chief designer in an electrical company but in 1908 he set up as an aeronautical engineer and the following year established his own company in Barking, Essex.

During the First World War his company produced the Handley Page bomber for the Royal Flying Corps. These planes carried out their first large-scale bombing raids on enemy military installations and submarine bases. By 1918 Handley Page had produced a four-engine bomber that could attack the industrial zones of the Saar and the Ruhr in Germany.

After the Armistice Handley Page turned to civil aviation. Unable to make the venture profitable, Handley Page merged with Imperial Airways. In 1930 Handley Page produced the first 40-seat airliner, the Hercules.

On the outbreak of the Second World War, Handley Page returned to producing military aircraft. The most important being the Halifax bomber. The government purchased 7,000 of these planes and Handley Page was knighted for his contribution to the war effort.

After the war Handley Page designed the four-engine jet, the Victor. Frederick Handley Page died in 1962.


Sir Frederick Handley Page

Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Industry & Commerce.

Location. 51° 30.723′ N, 0° 9.132′ W. Marker is in City of Westminster, England, in Greater London County. Marker is on Grosvenor Square just east of North Audley Street, on the left when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 18 Grosvenor Square, City of Westminster, England W1K 6LE, United Kingdom. Touch for directions.

Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Dwight David Eisenhower (within shouting distance of this marker) John Adams (about 120 meters away, measured in a direct line) George Seferis (about 150 meters away) Charles Edmund Peczenik (about 180 meters away) Colen Campbell (about 210 meters away) The Bee Gees (about 240 meters away) The Audley (approx. 0.3 kilometers away) Jack Buchanan (approx. 0.3 kilometers away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in City of Westminster.

Also see . . . Frederick Handley Page (Wikipedia). Sir Frederick Handley Page, CBE, FRAeS (15 November 1885 – 21 April 1962) was an English industrialist who was a pioneer in the aircraft industry and became known


Audio: Classic Lecture – Handley Page Ltd : celebrating the centenary of the first British aircraft company

Over six decades Handley Page Ltd produced a series of innovative aircraft designs. This conference explores the contribution made by the company and its founder and driving-force, Sir Frederick Handley Page.

The conference was organised by the Royal Aeronautical Society’s Historical Group on 10 September 2009. The lecture is introduced by Tony Edwards FRAeS, Sir Brian Burridge FRAeS & Dr Kit Mitchell FRAeS and the recording was edited by Eur Ing Mike Stanberry FRAeS.

Handley Page & Higher Education by Prof. Chris Atkin FRAeS & Gordon F. Page HonFRAeS

Sir Frederick Handley Page was one of the UK’s early lecturers in aerospace engineering, teaching students at London’s Northampton Institute, a forerunner of City, University of London. This passion for education never left him and, in 1945, he became one of the first board members of the College of Aeronautics, Cranfield. In first of two fascinating lectures, Chris Atkin, then a Professor at City, explores HP’s early career.

Cranfield’s then Pro-Chancellor, Gordon Page, continues the them by looking back at HP’s role at the fledgeling Cranfield University.

Handley Page, Lachmann, flow control and future civil aircraft by J. E. Green FRAeS

Handley Page Ltd developed two key concepts: the slotted wing and laminar flow. The first can be found on all modern transport aircraft and the second has arguably the greatest potential of all technologies for reducing the fuel burn and environmental impact of future civil aircraft. In this lecture Dr John Green explores the development of the two concepts and the fascinating relationship between the two co-creators of the slot, Sir Frederick Handley Page and Dr Gustav Lachmann.

The recording also includes the paper Handley Page military aircraft and prospects for future military aircraft by Simon Howison FRAeS.

The question-and-answer session that covers both papers follows and includes insights from Tony Chapman who was able to give a first-hand account of working with Lachmann and HP during the 1940s.

Classic Lecture – Sir Frederick Handley Page & the Royal Aeronautical Society by Prof Keith Hayward FRAeS

When Handley Page joined the Society in 1907, he was described as ‘something of an enfant terrible and one of the most remarkable personalities in a cause [aeronautics] which boasts of more young men’s successes than any other’. In this entertaining lecture, Keith Hayward recalls the explosion that occurred once ‘the enfant terrible’ and his colleagues came up against the Aeronautical establishment and goes on to explore the contribution that HP made during his next fifty years of membership.

The lecture concludes with a panel discussion where Prof Hayward is joined by the morning’s other contributors, Harry Fraser-Mitchell FRAeS and Andrew Brookes FRAeS.

Classic Lecture - The Handley Page Victor : Aircraft and Operational Roles by Andrew Brookes FRAeS

The third of the British V-bombers, the Victor was charged with delivering Britain’s nuclear deterrent in the late 1950s and 1960s, before taking on observation and tanker roles, including playing a key part in the Falklands Campaign. Historian and former Victor pilot Andrew Brookes takes us through the design, development and operation of the HP Victor and adds some personal recollections along the way.

Audio: Classic Lecture – Handley Page Ltd : 60 years of achievement by Harry Fraser-Mitchell FRAeS

Over six decades Handley Page Ltd produced a series of innovative aircraft designs. Starting with a profile of the company’s founder and driving force, Sir Frederick Handley Page, Harry Fraser-Mitchell takes us decade by decade through the company’s aircraft designs and concepts, including their large World War I aircraft, the Halifax and the Victor. He also explains how HP developed their aerodynamic slot, which proved to reduce stall-spins and helped the company to survive during the lean interwar period. The lecture concludes with the story behind the eventual collapse of the company and a review of some the company’s more interesting and most important projects.

The National Aerospace Library
11 January 2021 & updated 22 February 2021


Handley Page Bomber

The Handley Page O/100 and O/400 bombers were Britain’s only heavy bombers used during World War One. At the time, the Handley Page was the largest aircraft in the UK. By the end of World War One the Handley Page O/100 and O/400 had nearly proved themselves to be the “bloody paralysers” their original Admiralty remit had demanded of them.

The idea for a long-range bomber had been mooted in December 1914. The head of the Air Department at the Admiralty, Captain Murray Sueter, wanted a bomber that would be able to paralyse the Germans. Aircraft designer Frederick Handley Page took up the challenge, even if he did not have a pedigree for such work.

The Royal Navy’s brief was somewhat stretching. What was wanted was an aircraft that could provide a defence of the coast and naval ports but which was also capable of bombing Kiel, the heart of the German Navy, which housed the German High Seas Fleet.

Parts of the new aircraft were made at Crickelwood and then transported to Kingsbury where it was fully assembled. The completed aircraft was given the serial number 1455 and towed to Hendon for final checks.

The first prototype designed by Handley Page flew on December 17 th 1915 piloted by Lieutenant Commander John Babington. The cockpit and the area surrounding the crew were given added protection when compared to other aircraft. Unfortunately this made the aircraft too heavy for the power generated by the engines. There was not enough time to develop a more powerful engine so the only way to solve this was to ditch the extra plating even if it made the crew more vulnerable to gunfire. This became the basis for the first version of the Handley Page bomber – the O/100.

The Royal Navy was the first to procure the O/100 when it established a training school to fly the O/100 at Manston in Kent. It ordered 28 O/100’s for the Royal Naval Air Service. The Royal Flying Corps, realising the value that such an aircraft might have, ordered 12. This was a major success for the Handley Page Company as it had built a few aircraft before 1914 but these had been described as “unconventional”. In the space of 12 months, the idea had gone from thought to paper to actual flight.

The first Handley Page O/100 bombers came into service in late 1916. The Royal Naval Air Service (RNAS) was the first to use them at their base at Dunkirk, France. They were used for night-time raids as it soon became obvious that during the day, they were very vulnerable to German fighter aircraft. As the largest Allied aircraft, they would have appeared to be lumbering giants to much faster German Albatros and Fokker fighters. To start with, the tactic when using Handley-Page bombers was to send them off on a mission individually – to bomb a rail line, a German coastal position or to patrol the sea looking for U-boats. As aircrews became more experienced, this tactic was broadened so that a bombing raid on a German target might include up to 40 bombers.

In something that could have come out of a West End farce, the Germans were effectively given an O/100 by the British. An O/100 was flown to France to start its operational use against the Germans on January 1 st 1917 but was mistakenly landed twelve miles behind German lines – the crew had landed in the first field they could see after coming through the clouds. One of the German pilots who thoroughly examined the prize was Manfred von Richthofen. O/100 No 1463 was swiftly painted in the colours of the Imperial German Army Air Service

The O/100 was first used in the anger by the British on the night of March 16 th -17 th 1917 when a rail yard at Metz was attacked.

The second version, O/400, had more powerful engines and first flew in September 1917. The O/400 was fitted with more powerful engines, a larger fuel tank and was capable of carrying more bombs. By the time war ended in November 1918, over 400 O/400’s had been built and supplied to the War Office.

The O/400 had a top speed of 97 mph and a range of 700 miles. Two Rolls-Royce Eagle engines provided the power and if the weather conditions were favourable, the O/400 could spend eight hours in the air. The O/400 could carry 2000 lbs of bombs. These were either 112 lb or 250 lb bombs carried within the fuselage with two other bombs carried on external bomb racks. However, the O/400 could also carry a single 1,650 lb bomb – the largest in the military’s armoury during World War One.

To ensure that these were delivered as accurately as was possible, the O/400 was fitted with an early bomb aimer – the Drift Sight Mark 1A. For defence, the O/400 was fitted with five Lewis machine guns two at the front of the aircraft, two defending the rear while one other defended the sides.

When the night-time weather was good, up to 40 O/400’s would take part in raids on German industrial or transport installations. The furthest target from their bases was Mannheim. Such a raid involving forty O/400’s took place against the Saar region of Germany on the night of September 14 th – 15 th .

By the time the O/400 came into service, the German Air Force was having a very difficult time. The British naval blockade of German ports had led to severe shortages in all areas in Germany – including materials for making aircraft and the fuel to keep them in the air. This made large formation flights of Handley Page bombers more logical as they could be supported by Allied fighter aircraft and a larger number could deliver a much larger payload with consequently greater damage done to the target if it was successfully hit.

The Handley-Page bomber remained in use by the newly created Royal Air Force until the Vickers Vimy bomber replaced it once the war had ended. Those Handley Page bombers that survived the war were invariably converted to civilian use carrying both passengers and airmail.


Leading Particulars

Variant HP.80 B.1(A) B.2 B.2R B(SR).2 K.1A K.1 K.2
First flight 24th Dec 1952 1st Feb 1956 (B.1A 18th Jul 1960) 20th Feb 1959 19th Feb 1962 23rd Feb 1965 7th Dec 1965 (B.1A(K2P) 15th Apr 1965) 2nd Nov 1965 1st Mar 1972
CrewTwo to five - pilot, co-pilot and sometimes flight test engineers Four to six - Pilot, Co-pilot, Air Electronics Officer, Navigator Plotter, often Navigator Radar and optionally Aircraft Servicing Chief on a jumpseat.
ArmamentNoneBlue Danube or Yellow Sun nuclear bombs, Blue Steel nuclear missile (B.2 only), 1 x 2,000lb, 1 x 7,000lb, 21 x 1,000lb or 35 x 1,000lb bombsF49, F89 and F98 cameras and up to 108 photo-flares in 3 containersNone
Powerplant4 8,0000lb Armstrong- Siddeley Sapphire 1014 11,050 lb Armstrong-Siddeley Sapphire 20201/20701 4 17,250 lb Rolls-Royce Conway 10101 4 19,750 lb Rolls-Royce Conway 201014 11,050 lb Sapphire 207014 19,750 lb Rolls-Royce Conway 20101
Max. speed (at 34,000 ft)225 knots (mach 0.9)645 mph (1,038 km/h) (mach 1+ in a shallow dive)610 mph (982 km/h)
Service ceiling49,000 ft (14935 m)55,000 ft (16,764 m)49,000 ft (14,935 m)
Range?2,700 miles (4,345 km)4,600 miles (7,400 km)Probably more than B.2Similar to B.1Similar to B.14,500 miles (7,242 km) without using transfer fuel
Empty weight70,000 lb89,000 lb98,000 lbSimilar to B.1Similar to B.1114,050 lb
Max. take off weight105,000 lb180,000 lb (81,650 kg)223,000 lb185,000 lb238,000 lb (107,957 kg)
Wing spanAs B.1110 ft (33.53 m)120 ft (36.58 m)110 ft (33.53 m)117 ft (35.66 m)
Wing areaAs B.12,406 sq ft (223.5 sq m)2,597 sq ft (241.3 sq m)2,406 sq ft (223.5 sq m)2,580 sq ft
Length111 ft 7 in114 ft 11 in (35.30 m)114 ft 11 in (35.30 m)114 ft 11 in (35.30 m)114 ft 11 in (35.30 m)
Height26 ft 10.5 in28ft 1.5 in (8.59 m)

Data for HP.80 prototype is for WB771 as it first flew. Both it and WB775 were modified during their testing careers. Question marks on HP.80 data may be similar values to those of the B.1. My thanks to Roger Brooks of the HP Association and Vladimir Stanojevic for their beyond-the-call-of-duty efforts in researching some of the data here.

Site contents copyright © 2021
Damien Burke/Handmade by Machine Ltd.
This page last updated on Sunday 20th November 2016


Handley Page Fighter

Assuming development and service are similar to the fly catcher, I'd imagine it would be due for a replacement by the mid to late 30s.

What will other Navies be doing with aircraft in the mean time?

Just Leo

What are the specs for the Hobby?

Assuming development and service are similar to the fly catcher, I'd imagine it would be due for a replacement by the mid to late 30s.

What will other Navies be doing with aircraft in the mean time?

It's the same dimensions for a while, with a top speed of 156 kts, a range of 305 nmi., and an initial climb rate of 2,000 ft/min. Weight is up 500 lbs over the HPS, due to the engine change.

The career of the Flycatcher was prolonged because there was no recognized need for a change, and no recognized value in performance. Like the Stringbag, it worked, didn't break, and it was there. If the value of performance is recognized, improved performance will be sought. Roy Fedden will create improved Jupiters from 380/400 to 440 and 490 hp., as time goes by. Aerodynamic improvements will be more difficult, since the original quantum jump has already been made.

Handley Page, and his aerodynamicist, R.O. Bothwell, established an in house wind tunnel at the Northampton Polytechnic Institute in Clerkwell to facilitate the design process and ensure a valid product. Others recognizing the value of speed, and attempting to reproduce the aircraft, may be disappointed by results. It is certainly easier to fail than to succeed. Many anecdotal instances come to mind. If others seek to license Handley Page slats, Fred needs the money for his yacht. I don't know what Lachmann spent his money on.

PhilKearny

Driftless

It's the same dimensions for a while, with a top speed of 156 kts, a range of 305 nmi., and an initial climb rate of 2,000 ft/min. Weight is up 500 lbs over the HPS, due to the engine change.

The career of the Flycatcher was prolonged because there was no recognized need for a change, and no recognized value in performance. Like the Stringbag, it worked, didn't break, and it was there. If the value of performance is recognized, improved performance will be sought. Roy Fedden will create improved Jupiters from 380/400 to 440 and 490 hp., as time goes by. Aerodynamic improvements will be more difficult, since the original quantum jump has already been made.

Handley Page, and his aerodynamicist, R.O. Bothwell, established an in house wind tunnel at the Northampton Polytechnic Institute in Clerkwell to facilitate the design process and ensure a valid product. Others recognizing the value of speed, and attempting to reproduce the aircraft, may be disappointed by results. It is certainly easier to fail than to succeed. Many anecdotal instances come to mind. If others seek to license Handley Page slats, Fred needs the money for his yacht. I don't know what Lachmann spent his money on.

Driftless

TFSmith121

The US fighters in service at the time the HPS would

The US fighters (historically) in service at the time the HPS would have come in were the Curtiss PW-8/P-1 Hawk and the Boeing PW-9 (Army) and FB (Navy), which were both pretty reasonable designs for the day. Both were biplanes, but had solid performance the Curtiss design was developed from the R6/CR racers, which could do 236 mph in 1922-23 (188 with floats in 1924 for the Schneider race).

Just Leo

There was no equivalent in the time period. The Deperdussin racer, designed by Louis Bechereau, who designed the SPAD fighters, was the first aircraft to reach 200 kph, in 1913, powered by the only two-row rotary engine I know. It had a monocoque fuselage and a monoplane wing. The wing was not cantilever and had no high-lift devices. The Fieseler Storch had the devices, just as modern airliners use the devices to tame the smallest wing possible.

The Curtiss racer was indeed fast, but it had benefit of Mr Kirkham and his engines, yet to be copied by Rolls Royce to produce the Kestal engine which powered the Hawker Hart bomber which was faster than the RAF Bristol Bulldog just at the onset of its full and substantial production run, spawning the Hawker Fury, the first 200mph RAF intercepter, which was only built to equip 3 squadrons because it was too expensive. OTL, of course. The Hart was only ordered so that the Fairey Fox production could be limited to 28 examples, one squadron. The Fox, of 1925, was also faster than all fighters.The spec was "beat the Fox". It was close enough. Richard Fairey had licensed the Curtiss engine because it was superior, but the gummint wouldn't have it. The Fox was later re-engined with Kestrels. I'm no fool, and I wouldn't try to sneak a Curtiss D-12 past the British Gummint. The Kestrel version is shown in the drawings. The Harpy/Hobby are as fast as both Hart and Fox with Jupiter VII engines and faster still with VIIF engines with Townend ring, but the cowling has to wait until 1929.

Just Leo

Just Leo

TFSmith121

Oh, understood, but my point was more that

Oh, understood, but my point was more that as "futuristic" as the HPS looks in comparison, the leading edge biplanes of the day were actually better performers and (generally) operationally more mature.

Another example is the Dayton-Wright RB-1, which looks a decade ahead of its day, but when there was an effort to convert it to a combat aircraft, nothing quite gelled:

Monoplane, retractable landing gear, four-bladed prop, pretty slippery . yet it was, essentially, a dog.

Phx1138

Two questions: what do you see as armament? I'm picturing 2x0.303 in the cowl (possibly 4).

And what knock-ons are there for bomber development, both in Britain & elsewhere? If the Harpy is as fast as that, won't France, Germany, & the U.S. be compelled (or encouraged, anyhow) to build faster bombers? Does that point to smaller ones, more like B-10s? Or more toward *Battles or *Devestators, even?

Just Leo

Oh, understood, but my point was more that as "futuristic" as the HPS looks in comparison, the leading edge biplanes of the day were actually better performers and (generally) operationally more mature.

Another example is the Dayton-Wright RB-1, which looks a decade ahead of its day, but when there was an effort to convert it to a combat aircraft, nothing quite gelled:

I understand as well. I'm familiar with the Dayton-Wright, and yes, it was wrong. The Bristol monoplane racer, meant to showcase the amazing Jupiter engine, and also featuring retractable undercarriage was also wrong. They were wrong as racers, and would be wrong as airplanes. The Verville-Sperry Racer was righter, also just a racer, because it was a good airplane and featured retractable undercarriage, but the undercarriage fitment wasn't quite as refined as it might be, with drag-inducing gaps.

While you mention that the Curtiss R-6 racer did 236 mph., you didn't mention what the operationally mature, based on WWI technology fighters achieved for top speed, being some 80 mph slower, still with engines over 400 hp.

The HPS may look futuristic, but it also IS futuristic technically. Curtiss thought so much of leading edge slats, he used the concept, avoiding license fees, and defeating poor Fred in an American court. Tit for tat for his stolen engine, perhaps. Slotted flaps were also nowhere to be seen at this time. You may note that retractable undercarriage isn't on the agenda until it becomes viable. Perhaps, I should have shown the original corrected rudder. It was so ugly I didn't want to see it. Not futuristic at all. So WWI.

Just Leo

Two questions: what do you see as armament? I'm picturing 2x0.303 in the cowl (possibly 4).

And what knock-ons are there for bomber development, both in Britain & elsewhere? If the Harpy is as fast as that, won't France, Germany, & the U.S. be compelled (or encouraged, anyhow) to build faster bombers? Does that point to smaller ones, more like B-10s? Or more toward *Battles or *Devestators, even?

The 2 Vickers .303 mgs fit in the upper fuselage firing through the engine. Brownings in due course. Some hand-wavium will be used to install .50s in the Mercury-powered units. Where this all ends is the pod-mounted underwing Hispanos, but keep that in your hat.

The butterflies remain largely unpondered. If you're at all familiar with the Whitley bomber, the designer didn't know how to build flaps, even simple ones. He added 7 degrees to the wing's angle of incidence to meet the landing speed requirement without flaps. Then, someone told him how to make simple flaps, but he left the angle of incidence where it was. There's no butterflies at Armstrong-Whitworth. For additional influences, you click on the sign that says "Post Reply". While this technology is most significant in getting out of the bi-plane era, it loses much of its impact with alternate technologies and engineering of the late thirties and forties. I've drawn the future, and it's not significantly better than your average Spitfire, except for the landing gear.

Yulzari

Used to use it in motor racing. Very effective but a b*gger to clean off if it dried or burned. Then we discovered Shell tractor oil. Better and vastly cheaper. Makes sense. Tractor motors run hard for hours on end and can't stop for frequent oil changes so they have to have the best. No more oil changes between races. One year, one fill.

The smell of Castrol R brings it all back instantly. Instant nostalgia in a can.

Just Leo

By 1929, the Harpy/Hobby series had progressed through more powerful engines, and the Townend ring had been introduced as a retrofit on the 490 hp Jupiter VIIF engines, imparting a top speed above 200 mph. Hawker had introduced the Hart bomber with the new Rolls Royce Kestrel engine, and it was almost as fast. It behooved the Air Ministry to inquire into a Kestrel version of Harpy. Sir Frederick responded with Havoc, which first flew in 1930, with an enclosed cockpit as well as other changes. The addition of a canopy was deemed a necessity since the Havoc flew to speeds near 250 mph, and beyond, with the more developed engines. The rate of climb was astounding as well. Certain members of the Air Council were disturbed, and didn't think aircraft that fast could be controlled. These were the same ones who thought aircraft really needed two wings, bombers could always get through, and dive bombing was just wrong. In spite of them, trials were held. The first prototype had built in provision for naval equipment, although the Admiralty had not asked for it. A pre-production example was fitted with a centerline pylon which allowed fitment of a 250 lb bomb or a 55 gallon auxiliary fuel tank. The undercarriage was a streamlined cantilever unit with optional wheel spats, designed by George Dowty. The wheel spats were good for 10 mph in speed and improved range, but impaired maintenance. Admiralty orders followed well into the double digits, and the RAF ordered two hundred. Sir Frederick was shocked. Apparently, there was a new Air Member for Supply and Research, a man named Dowding, who thought that the order was justified.


On qualifying in 1906 he was appointed head designer at Johnson & Phillips Ltd, an electrical engineering company based in Charlton in south east London. In 1907 he joined the Royal Aeronautical Society where he met the artist and aviation pioneer José Weiss , who was performing experiments with gliders using an inherently stable wing design based on the seed-pods of the Zanonia macrocarpa which he was to patent in 1908. Unfortunately Handley-Page, in his enthusiasm for aviation, started experimental work at Johnson and Phillips without authorisation: this was interpreted by the board as attempted fraud, and he was dismissed, leaving his assistant, A.R. Low, who would later become an aircraft designer for Vickers, in charge. [ 4 ]

He immediately set up his own business, with an office in Woolwich, and accepted a commission to build an aircraft for G.P. Deverall-Saul. After some searching for a suitable flying ground he leased a small stretch of marshland and a shed at Creekmouth in Essex. Here he constructed his first aircraft, a canard configuration glider with a tricycle undercarriage and wing of the Weiss pattern. Handley Page had entered into an agreement whereby he could use Weiss's patents in exchange for making an improved wing for his next glider, and it was agreed to take a stand at the Aero Exhibition to be held at Olympia in 1909. In June 1909 he established his business as a limited company, with an authorised capital of £10,000.

Neither the glider nor the aircraft built for Saul-Deverell, which was only powered by a 7 hp (5.2 kW) engine, were successful but Saul-Deverell ordered a second machine and two other commissions were received, and Handley Page also set about designing and building his first powered aircraft, the Bluebird (so-called because of the blue-grey rubberised fabric with which it was covered), intended for the 1910 Aero exhibition. As well as complete aircraft, the company also supplied metal fixings for aircraft and aircraft propellers, two of which were used by one of the Willows airships. After it was exhibited at Olympia Handley Page set about attempting to learn to fly using the Bluebird . A brief straight flight was first achieved on 26 May 1910, but after a few more similar efforts Handley Page's first attempt at a turn ended in a crash. It was rebuilt with a slightly more powerful engine and the addition of wing-warping for lateral control, but proved no more successful and was abandoned, and work begun on a new, larger, monoplane. [ 5 ]

At this time he was also active in the reform of the Royal Aeronautical Society, and gained additional income from journalism and lecturing, giving classes at Finsbury on electrical engineering and in 1911 obtaining a post as a lecturer in aeronautics at the Northampton Polytechnic Institute in Clerkenwell, east London. Here he had a wind-tunnel built, and he also sold the Bluebird to the Institute for use as an instructional airframe.

First World War

Shortly after the outbreak of the First World War in 1914 Handley Page was invited by Murray Sueter to the Admiralty to discuss Naval air requirements. The result was a specification for a large twin-engined aircraft, capable of carrying 600 lb (270 kg) of bombs and larger than anything that had been flown at the time. The eventual result was the Handley Page O/100, first flown in December 1915 and the start of the Handley Page company's reputation for building large aircraft. During the war it was further developed into the O/400 and O/1500 bombers.

Development of leading-edge slots

In 1917 Handley Page and his aerodynamicist R.O. Bothwell started wind-tunnel experiments intended to combine the low drag of high aspect ratio wings with the delayed stall at high angles of attack of a low aspect ratio wing. The first attempts involved using a wing divided into separate square panels by slots running chordwise, but this produced no significant result. The idea of a wing divided into two sections by a narrow spanwise slot was then tried, and the first experiment, using a slot at 25% chord in a RAF 15 section wing gave an increase in lift of 25%. The shape and position of the slots was found to be critical, and a series of wind-tunnel test were made during 1918-19 under conditions of great secrecy, since Handley Page realised the commercial value of the idea and consequently wanted it kept secret until it could be patented, delaying doing this until he was able to file a patent for a controllable device in which the slot could be opened and closed by the pilot. This was granted on 24 October 1919. [ 6 ] The principle had been independently arrived at by Gustav Lachmann, a German pilot and engineer: Lachmann attempted to patent the idea a few weeks before Handley Page, but his patent application was initially refused. When his patent was retroactively granted, he contacted Handley Page but rather than getting involved in a legal dispute the two men arrived at a mutually satisfactory arrangement, with the patents being shared and Lachmann accepting a post as a consultant for Handley Page. He was later to become the company's head of design and later director of research.

He was knighted in 1942 for his contribution to the war effort.

In 1946 along with Sir Roy Fedden he played a major role the establishment of the College of Aeronautics at Cranfield, and was chairman of its governing body until his death [ 7 ]

He died on 21 April 1962 in Grosvenor Square, Westminster, London at age 76. [ 1 ] The house in Grosvenor Square where Handley Page lived, No. 18, now bears a blue plaque. [ 8 ]


Frederick Handley Page : biography

At this time he was also active in the reform of the Royal Aeronautical Society, and gained additional income from journalism and lecturing, giving classes at Finsbury on electrical engineering and in 1911 obtaining a post as a lecturer in aeronautics at the Northampton Polytechnic Institute in Clerkenwell, east London. Here he had a wind-tunnel built, and he also sold the Bluebird to the Institute for use as an instructional airframe.

First World War

Shortly after the outbreak of the First World War in 1914 Handley Page was invited by Murray Sueter to the Admiralty to discuss Naval air requirements. The result was a specification for a large twin-engined aircraft, capable of carrying of bombs and larger than anything that had been flown at the time. The eventual result was the Handley Page O/100, first flown in December 1915 and the start of the Handley Page company’s reputation for building large aircraft. During the war it was further developed into the O/400 and O/1500 bombers.

Development of leading-edge slots

In 1917 Handley Page and his aerodynamicist R.O. Bothwell started wind-tunnel experiments intended to combine the low drag of high aspect ratio wings with the delayed stall at high angles of attack of a low aspect ratio wing. The first attempts involved using a wing divided into separate square panels by slots running chordwise, but this produced no significant result. The idea of a wing divided into two sections by a narrow spanwise slot was then tried, and the first experiment, using a slot at 25% chord in a RAF 15 section wing gave an increase in lift of 25%. The shape and position of the slots was found to be critical, and a series of wind-tunnel test were made during 1918-19 under conditions of great secrecy, since Handley Page realised the commercial value of the idea and consequently wanted it kept secret until it could be patented, delaying doing this until he was able to file a patent for a controllable device in which the slot could be opened and closed by the pilot. This was granted on 24 October 1919. Barnes 1987 p.210-11 The principle had been independently arrived at by Gustav Lachmann, a German pilot and engineer: Lachmann attempted to patent the idea a few weeks before Handley Page, but his patent application was initially refused. When his patent was retroactively granted, he contacted Handley Page but rather than getting involved in a legal dispute the two men arrived at a mutually satisfactory arrangement, with the patents being shared and Lachmann accepting a post as a consultant for Handley Page. He was later to become the company’s head of design and later director of research.

He was knighted in 1942 for his contribution to the war effort.

In 1946 along with Sir Roy Fedden he played a major role the establishment of the College of Aeronautics at Cranfield, and was chairman of its governing body until his death Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford: OUP.

He died on 21 April 1962 in Grosvenor Square, Westminster, London at age 76. The house in Grosvenor Square where Handley Page lived, No. 18, now bears a blue plaque.


Handley Page history comes to life in Parrsboro

PARRSBORO, N.S. &ndash Crash-landing in Parrboro in 1919 had its benefits.

&ldquoWe sat on the grass picking delicious wild strawberries, while the youth and beauty of the place ran over to us still in their night attire but afraid to come too near fearing we were Germans,&rdquo said Steve Johnson.

The 100th anniversary of the crash-landing of the Handley Page Atlantic aeroplane was celebrated in Parrsboro and at Ottawa House on the weekend of July 5 to 7.

Part of the celebration included readings from newspaper clippings about the crash-landing, including an account from crew-member Herbert Brackley, as read by Johnson at Ottawa House on July 7.

With the hopes of becoming the first aeroplane to travel from Newfoundland to New York City, the Handley Page departed from Newfoundland on the evening of July 4.

On the morning of July 5, one of the four Rolls Royce engines blew apart, sending a piston and connecting rod through the crankcase.

At the time, Parrsboro was one of the few towns in Nova Scotia to have electric street lights, and the crew saw the lights of Parrsboro at about 2:30 a.m.

&ldquoOne and a half hours before dawn we were over the lights of Parrsboro on the coast of the Bay of Fundy,&rdquo said Johnson, through Brackley&rsquos retelling of the event.

&ldquoWe circled around and waited for dawn and land. Our noise disturbed the peaceful slumber in that part of beautiful Nova Scotia,&rdquo he added. &ldquoSeveral enthusiasts with motors (cars) shone their headlights on a small area of the beach on which they thought we could land.&rdquo

The Handley Page eventually landed on a horse racetrack at 5:45 a.m.

&ldquoWe landed very gently on the oval track, but I could not keep on it because of the sharp left turn. We struck some rough ground at low speed which burst a tire and we tipped gently on our nose.&rdquo

The Handley Page remained in Parrsboro for repairs until Oct. 9, then continued its flight to New York City, carrying the first airmail from Canada to the U.S.

Twelve people were on the flight to New York, including four reporters. At the time it was the greatest number of people to fly in one aircraft.

After New York, the Handley Page flew to Chicago.

Besides the retelling of the crash-landing, the July 7 events at Ottawa House included a fly-over of several airplanes from the Debert Airport, a Q&A by Kerwin Davison, builder of a full-size replica of the Handley Page's 347 horsepower V12 Rolls Royce engine, and, also, a display of a 1/18th sized model replica of the Handley Page Atlantic built by John Meadows, with the engines created on a 3D printer by Garry Stern.


Handley Page Halifax II

The Halifax shared with the Lancaster the major burden of Bomber Command’s night bombing campaign against Nazi Germany but unlike the Lancaster, which only served as a bomber during the war, the Halifax was used extensively on other duties including glider-tug, agent dropping transport and general reconnaissance aircraft in Coastal Command.

It was the second British four-engined bomber to enter service in World War Two. Nevertheless the first to bomb Germany when one took part in a raid on Hamburg on the night of 12-13 March 1941. Due to mounting losses on Bomber Command operations over Germany Halifax bombers were restricted to less hazardous targets from September 1943.

However, between 1941 and 1945 the Halifax made over 75,000 bombing sorties and dropped 227,610 tons (231,300 tonnes) of bombs more than a quarter of all bombs dropped on Germany by the Royal Air Force.

The Halifax was in the process of being replaced as a front line bomber in 1945 but it continued in service with Coastal and Transport Commands after the war. The last operational flight was made by a Coastal Command Halifax in March 1952 while operating from Gibraltar.


Watch the video: Σχολικο βιβλίο Γ Λυκείου κριτήριο παρεμβολής


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