The 1900 exhibition through advertising cards

The 1900 exhibition through advertising cards

  • Exhibition of 1900 - Monumental entrance.

    ANONYMOUS

  • 1900 Exhibition - Luminous Palace - Ponsin.

    ANONYMOUS

  • 1900 Exhibition - Palace of Electricity and Water Tower.

    ANONYMOUS

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Title: Exhibition of 1900 - Monumental entrance.

Author : ANONYMOUS (-)

Creation date : 1900

Date shown: 1900

Dimensions: Height 10.2 - Width 6.6

Technique and other indications: Chromolithographs on cardboard Published in Paris by publishers and printers Laas and Pécaud

Storage place: MuCEM website

Contact copyright: © Photo RMN-Grand Palais

Picture reference: 01.2.33 / Inv .: 995.1.1051.1 A - LA4.3.3.1

Exhibition of 1900 - Monumental entrance.

© Photo RMN-Grand Palais

To close

Title: 1900 Exhibition - Luminous Palace - Ponsin.

Author : ANONYMOUS (-)

Creation date : 1900

Date shown: 1900

Dimensions: Height 11.3 - Width 8.2

Technique and other indications: Chromolithographs on cardboard Published in Paris by publishers and printers Laas and Pécaud

Storage place: MuCEM website

Contact copyright: © Photo RMN-Grand Palais

Picture reference: 01.2.34 / Inv .: 995.1.1051.14 - LA4.3.3.19

1900 Exhibition - Luminous Palace - Ponsin.

© Photo RMN-Grand Palais

To close

Title: 1900 Exhibition - Palace of Electricity and Water Tower.

Author : ANONYMOUS (-)

Creation date : 1900

Date shown: 1900

Dimensions: Height 10.4 - Width 6.7

Technique and other indications: Chromolithographs on cardboard Published in Paris by publishers and printers Laas and Pécaud

Storage place: MuCEM website

Contact copyright: © Photo RMN-Grand Palais

Picture reference: 01.2.35 / Inv .: 995.1.1051.8 - LA4.3.3.3

1900 Exhibition - Palace of Electricity and Water Tower.

© Photo RMN-Grand Palais

Publication date: March 2016

Historical context

The 1900 Exposition is the fifth Universal Exposition organized in Paris. Inaugurated under the chairmanship of Emile Loubet, it has enabled France to offer visitors sumptuous attractions and splendor commensurate with the country's economic power. Thanks to the deployment devoted to light, the French government has offered nations the image of a France that is at the same time prestigious by its beauty and its brilliance, and predominant in economic and industrial terms.

Image Analysis

Three poles of light attracted visitors: the Monumental Gate, the Glass Palace and the Electricity Palace. The Exhibition had thirty-six ticket offices, but it was through René Binet's Monumental Gate, Place de la Concorde, that the crowd flocked, attracted by the powerful lighting of its three large arches and its dome.
As for the Glass Palace by architect Ponsin, also called the Luminous Palace, it was built entirely of glass and iron, a modern architecture whose major spectacle came from the 12,000 lamps that lit it.
Even more representative was the Palace of Electricity built next to the Water Tower. At its top, the allegorical statue of Electricity hid a dynamo system that illuminated it at nightfall. At night, visitors flocked to these places to admire this spectacle. Charles Lavigne testifies: “In the evening, the Electricity appears as if haloed in a dazzling robe of fire which the lighthouse of 10,000 candles drapes around it (...) other lamps were placed and in the evening, when the he building is set ablaze, the play of changing lights which can be varied at will by an ingenious mechanism placed below, further increases the impression of the phantasmagoric fairyland given by this continuous stream of sprays of fire. ”
Likewise, the “Rue de Paris” benefited from electric lighting until midnight and attracted crowds with its cabarets.
This deployment of exterior illuminations responded to technical exhibitions inside certain buildings, such as the lighting work of the City of Paris in the pavilion dedicated to it. The “Supply” section of the Department of Municipal Affairs presented 250 light photos, embedded in a cabinet where they were lit internally by an electrical system.

Alongside the Eiffel Tower, a symbol of modern technology remaining from the 1889 Exhibition, these buildings, pastiches of oriental and palatial architecture from previous centuries, were adorned with a new allegorical statuary: goddesses of Science, of the Republic, of Electricity…, profane entities that the idea of ​​progress had given birth to.

Interpretation

The 1900 Exhibition was prepared well in advance (the first decree dates from 1892), and the chromo representing the Luminous Palace is an example. It was part of a series of thirty-two cards printed before the event and had a dual advertising vocation: it both praised a chocolate (Duroyon & Ramette advertisement) and announced the future exhibition with an image and a text based on the one hand on the spectacular side (light and architecture) and, on the other hand, on new technologies (here electricity and glass on a metal frame).
The “Electricity Fairy”, as it was called, was represented on many advertising media alongside other sources of energy. Whether it is through the large format (the poster) or the small format (the advertising card), the dissemination of its image has helped to make it known to the population, the majority of whom had not visited the Exhibition. universal.

  • architecture
  • electricity
  • Universal exhibitions
  • modernism
  • monuments
  • Trocadero Palace
  • Paris
  • publicity
  • Loubet (Emile)
  • Palace of Electricity
  • 1900 universal exhibition

Bibliography

Linda AIMONE The Universal Exhibitions. 1851-1900 Pollina, Paris, Berlin, 1993.Philippe BOUIN and Christian-Philippe CHANUT French History of Fairs and Universal Exhibitions Paris, Nesle, 1980.Jacques DUQUESNE (preface), The Universal Exhibition 1900 Paris, Descamps, 1900, 1991. Werner PLUM The Universal Exhibitions in the 19th century, shows of socio-cultural change: Social and cultural aspects of industrialization Bonn-Bad Godesberg, Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung, 1977.Brigitte SCHROEDER-GUDEHUS and Anne RASMUSSEN The Fastes of Progress: The Guide to Universal Exhibitions, 1851-1992 Paris, Flammarion, 1992.

To cite this article

Nathalie JANES, "The 1900 exhibition through advertising cards"


Video: 35 photos of the different pavilions of the Universal Exhibition of Paris in 1900